A local walk

A recent visit to the GP about something unrelated (and which thankfully was nothing to worry about) revealed the alarming news that my blood pressure is higher than it should be. If I am not able to reduce it myself through ‘lifestyle changes’ I may be looking at medication in the future. This news has motivated me to make some positive changes to my now very sedentary lock-down, home-worker life, including becoming more active. It’s the old chicken and egg scenario: I started walking less as my arthritis pain worsened, which probably led to me becoming even more unfit and putting weight on, which undoubtedly has made the pain worse, and so on. Having now to sit at my desk all day, five days a week, has not helped matters. Although these are proper reasons and not just excuses, I am still set on taking action to improve my health in whatever way I can.

We are back to walking locally again, though for me that never changed during the few months’ interval between lock downs; I have only been out of town once in the past 10 months and have become something of a contented recluse. This morning, however, the bright sunshine and dry sky tempted me out into my locality for a bit of a brisk stroll. There are some great places to walk within the wider township, but I would need to get a bus there. On my own doorstep, options are very limited. Nevertheless, off I set in pursuit of fresh air and exercise and with camera at the ready.

Westwood Flash

I live in an area which was heavily mined when Coal was King in Wigan. Although the collieries are long gone they have left a legacy of flashes – lakes formed on sites of mining subsidence. There are eight flashes in total within the nature reserve. The Leigh branch of the Leeds & Liverpool canal cuts through the bodies of water and these days is extremely popular with walkers, cyclists and boaters.

Three or four anglers were in situ, one with a very bored looking child who was distracting himself by rolling about in the mud whilst the female companion of another looked like she would rather be watching paint dry. I was much more interested in the wild fowl amongst the reed beds.

There were lots of people around, mostly walking dogs and mostly very friendly. I turned around to look for the speaker of “Long time, no see,” to find a man who daily used to travel into town on the same bus as me, also now a home-worker. I don’t know him, other than as a fellow former member of the 07:24 bus micro-community, but it was strangely uplifting to meet again somebody who seems part of a distant and strange past, and to be reminded that we will hopefully return to those banal but now welcome routines.

A lot of money has been spent on improving accessibility to this area in recent months, partly to mitigate the presence and associated noise, visual and environmental pollution from a pointless new dual-carriageway, nick-named locally the road to nowhere, because, being part of a much longer link road whose other parts have not yet been constructed, it really doesn’t go anywhere. It’s a relief to see that wildlife still seems to be thriving, post road construction.

Two men, one in a bizarre, possibly home-made, face covering which looked like it had been fashioned out of several plastic bottles, asked for directions to the canal tow path. I indicated the way that I was myself headed. By this time, the route was really quite busy and it was sometimes necessary to stand to one side to let people pass. It’s a pleasant walk, more so since the improvements, and I regretted that I hadn’t been walking here more often.

Arriving at the towpath, I decided that as a re-introductory amble I had gone far enough for today. I spent a few minutes watching the swans and having a short chat with another person I knew in the old life.

Lost in my own thoughts and camera lens, I was momentarily startled when a woman asked me if I put photos on “that website”. “What website is that?”, I replied, wondering if this humble domain had come to her attention. It had not, of course. It was something else entirely that I have never heard of.

I spotted a few people in the wood on the other side of the water where I had thought it was inaccessible. More to investigate on another walk.

And in the other direction lies the largest of the flashes and walks that I haven’t done for years.

As others have written, it is easy to forget the green spaces that are close at hand. I’m looking forward to renewing that connection.

7 thoughts on “A local walk

  1. shazza January 17, 2021 / 8:40 pm

    Wow, that looks a wonderful place to have locally, and more of it to explore in the future too. Plenty of wildlife. Not quite sure if the black water bird is a moorhen or coot. Probably a coot. X

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Eunice January 17, 2021 / 10:51 pm

    It looks like a good place for a walk, even nicer on a sunny spring or summer day. The black water bird is definitely a coot, moorhens have red front face shields and beaks 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. John Bainbridge January 18, 2021 / 8:19 am

    My blood pressure is usually higher in the doctor’s than at home – the so called white coat syndrome.

    Like

    • Welcome to the Beautiful North January 18, 2021 / 10:12 am

      I followed the advice to buy a home BP monitor, but I found that I was becoming so anxious about what the reading would be that that too was probably giving misleading ‘spike’ results. I think I’m going to be trying out a device that stays put and takes readings over a 24 hour period without me having to think about it. The main thing is that I’m aware of it now as I previously had no idea there was a problem.

      Liked by 1 person

      • John Bainbridge January 18, 2021 / 2:42 pm

        A good idea. Stay safe.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. matthewmckinnonsblog January 21, 2021 / 7:23 pm

    I enjoyed you blog again. Glad you have decided to try and get out and about. It looks like you have a nice place to walk. It’s amazing the places you find locally when travel elsewhere is banned!

    Liked by 1 person

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